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THE ORCHESTRAL FLUTIST

Growing up in Budapest, I received a world-class education in all possible aspects of music making. Still, in the early 2000s, when I started my studies at the Liszt Academy, there was still no culture for independent youth orchestras across Hungary. I longed to gather more practical experience with orchestral musicianship in my everyday life, so I decided to found an orchestra together with Gergely Madaras (who happens to be my husband today).

Our brain child, the Budapest Youth Symphony Orchestra, was the first independent youth orchestra in Hungary, with circa 80 regular members touring internationally. Between 2002 and 2006 I served as their solo flutist and creative director which gave me the opportunity to learn, not only about orchestral flute playing, but also about long term artistic planning, organization and fund-raising. 

"I gained an extensive amount of knowledge not only about orchestral flute playing, but also about long term artistic planning, organizing and fund-raising."

Orchestral playing has continued to shape my musical path ever since. Shortly after completing my studies, I became a regular guest player in the Vienna State Opera Orchestra, performing alongside the musicians of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. During my years performing with them, I participated in countless opera performances and took part in several unique projects including the world premiere of Aribert Reimann’s opera Medea. Additionally, in the past years, I played as a guest in the BBC Philharmonic and have been the guest principal of the Georgian Sinfonietta and the Chamber Orchestra of the Hungarian National Philharmonic.

"I have become a regular guest player in the Vienna State Opera Orchestra, performing alongside the musicians of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra."

Since 2008, I am the principal flutist of the Orchester Jakobsplatz München, which brings to life music written by Jewish composers or influenced by Jewish culture. The projects of the OJM create bridges between cultures and present experiences to audiences that go far beyond music. As a descendant of survivors of the Auschwitz, Mauthausen death camps and of the Budapest ghetto, being a member of the OJM and promoting Jewish culture in contemporary Germany (and other countries while on tour) holds particular importance for me.

www.orchester-jakobsplatz.org